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March 31, 2015

Use v Addiction

Myself, a good cup of coffee is part of my morning ritual. I like caffeine- in fact, I used to imbibe quite a lot in my younger years in coffee, soda, even No Doz for a cheap high. Was I addicted to caffeine? I certainly would get a “coffee headache” if I missed a morning or worse, a day.

These days, I have my one cup, and that’s my caffeine for the day. If I go without, I miss it, but it does not cause repetitive thoughts of NEEDING caffeine.

So, was I addicted to caffeine? Abused it? Used it?

The large majority of health care professionals call any use of nicotine, an addiction. Not use, but addiction. I find that stretching the facts. True, smoking IS addictive- both pycho-social and chemical. The additives in cigarettes create the craving. pure nic in non-threatening levels (specifically retail e-liquid, OTC NRT’s) is only MILDLY addictive.  For me, I can go 24 hrs w/out vaping or repetitive thoughts of craving a vape.

See Below:

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition Dramatically Increases the Motivation to Self-Administer Nicotine in Rats

[excerpt]

In addition, it has been shown in several species that nicotine has relatively weak reinforcing properties compared with other addictive drugs. Such a weak reinforcing property cannot explain by itself the intense addictive properties of tobacco smoking, the difficulty most smokers experience in attempting to quit, and the high relapse rates after quitting (Goldberg et al., 1981; Corrigall and Coen, 1989; Donny et al., 1995; Rose and Corrigall, 1997). There is also considerable individual variability in abuse and frequency of consumption associated with smoking as with other drugs of abuse. In animal models, as in humans, not all rats readily self-administer nicotine, and some aspects of the propensity of the animals to self-administer drugs can be predicted by their locomotor response to novelty (Piazza et al., 1989; Suto et al., 2001).

via Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition Dramatically Increases the Motivation to Self-Administer Nicotine in Rats.

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